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The Kings Cards in the Tarot

Languages ranging from Albanian to Zulu each have a proverb that says something like “Every man is a king.”

So what do we know about the King cards in the Tarot deck?

tarot | zoomtarot | tarotbyemail | emailtarot | tarot readings | tarot reader | Tarot London | corporate tarot | business tarotKings represent male energy, masculine authority, and/or someone who wants to be in control. A King can also signify that the meanings of the cards in a reading are unambiguous and long-lasting.

Each King represents a different quailty, depending on his suit.  In a Tarot reading your reader will explain what he means specifically to you.

On a literal level, a King stands for a person, typically a man aged 35 or older. He likely has a strong and controlled — or controlling — personality. He’s not flighty or changeable. Instead, he’s a responsible person who wants to be the boss at his job and the provider for his family.

When a King card appears in a past position, he probably denotes your father or a father figure in your earlier life — perhaps an older brother, or a male mentor. If influenced by negative cards when in a past position, he might represent a domineering male influence from your younger days, such as a bullying male classmate or a tyrannical teacher or colleague.

If dealt in a present position, the King might represent an aspect of yourself, such as your drive to be in control, your ambitions, and your determination. He rarely represents violent upheaval or radical changes, but instead has to do with orderliness, stability, and gradual movement in a positive direction.

A King, of course, can refer to a love interest, especially a man over 35. If you’ve embarked on a new romance and a King shows up, it’s generally a good sign. Be careful, however — he can represent an ideal choice and stand in contrast to the man you’ve chosen. He might be telling you to find someone more like a King, someone stable, pleasant, successful, and in control of his life.

When a King card pops up in a future position, he probably forecasts security. He may herald the end of a state of chaos that has surrounded you. A stable future lies ahead and, if the card refers to a person, a true leader is about to enter your life. You might expect a satisfying and productive new job or hobby, or an incoming manager at work who’ll end a period of confusion. A King in a future position may also mean you’ll soon gain a clearer idea of your life’s direction.

Regardless of its position, any King nearly always bodes well. So relax, take comfort in his presence, and prepare for good times ahead!

Want more information about Tarot cards and readings? I’m pleased to offer single-card, three-card, and Celtic Cross ten-card readings at various price ranges, all via email or face-to-face across Zoom or Skype.

And, although the world is an uncertain place right now, if you’re planning a future party — whether it’s an intimate get-together or a large-scale event, consider adding the excitement of Tarot readings. I’d love to chat with you, so to find out more, please email info@tarotbyemail.com.

I am the Weekend Witch, and I can’t wait to help you meet your destiny!

 


The Tarot and Seven Hexes from an Irish Witch

The Irish occultist Tara Tine has a YouTube blog called “Diary of a Ditch Witch.” Here’s intriguing material from her recent video, “7 Excellent Irish Curses,” and some correspondences to the Tarot.

tarot | zoomtarot | tarotbyemail | emailtarot | tarot readings | tarot reader | Tarot London | corporate tarot | business tarot1. “May your house fall upon you.” This curse reminds me of the Tower card in the Tarot, which in many decks shows a turret struck by lightning. If you’ve got a leaky roof or a troublesome boiler, perhaps your ex sent this spell your way.

2. “My cat curses you.” This calls to mind the black cat at the feet of the Queen of Wands. This Queen epitomizes a witch: determined, self-confident, sexy, and powerful. You don’t want her cat to curse you. In addition, Gaelic folklore includes a figure called “Cat-sìth” (pronounced “Cat Shee-ha”), a black feline with a white chest who is a shapeshifting witch.

3. “May you be badly positioned on a windy day.” It’s the opposite of the Irish blessing: “May the wind be always at your back.” In the Tarot, the entire suit of Swords comprises the element of air, and some Swords cards carry negative meanings, especially if positioned badly.

4. “Six cartloads of graveyard clay upon you.” Several Internet pages tell how to use cemetery dirt in spells. The Tarot’s Death card typically shows no graveyard, but Judgement depicts bodies rising from coffins. These two cards aren’t always threatening, however; the former can mean the death of something negative, such as a divorce from an abusive husband, and the latter stands for new beginnings.

5. “May you have red diarrhoea.” This one is almost humorous until you consider that bloody diarrhoea is a symptom of illness, including bubonic plague. Some say the Fool card has to do with sickness, especially for those foolish or careless about their health.

6. “May the Devil make a ladder of your backbone, while picking apples in the Garden of Hell.” Of course, this calls up (literally) the Devil. That card warns against entrapment; the couple on the Rider-Waite card are in chains. It also cautions against a lack of moderation.

7. “The trees have been felled in the woods where your race lives.” Sounds like an environmentalist warning against abusing our planet’s resources. I’m reminded of the Two of Wands, which in the Rider-Waite deck shows a man standing between two sprouting staves and contemplating a globe. Fortunately, this card holds the promise of growth and prosperity—the opposite of any curse!

Want more information about Tarot cards and readings? I’m pleased to offer single-card, three-card, and Celtic Cross ten-card readings at various price ranges, all via email or face-to-face across Zoom or Skype.

And, although the world is an uncertain place right now, if you’re planning a future party — whether it’s an intimate get-together or a large-scale event, consider adding the excitement of Tarot readings. I’d love to chat with you, so to find out more, please email info@tarotbyemail.com.

I am the Weekend Witch, and I can’t wait to help you meet your destiny!


Four Fascinating Facts about Tarot Cards

Number 3 Might Amaze You!

tarot | zoomtarot | tarotbyemail | emailtarot | tarot readings | tarot reader | Tarot London | corporate tarot | business tarotThe philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer said, “Boredom is the reverse side of fascination.” If you’re bored due to the lockdown or anything else, here are four fascinating facts about Tarot cards.

1. Tarot Cards Weren’t Banned by the Medieval Church

It’s often claimed that the Tarot was specifically forbidden by the Medieval Catholic Church. During the Inquisition in Spain careful records were kept about what the Church did and did not label as heresy. Interestingly, the Tarot is never mentioned. The reason for this may have been financial. Printing was an important industry. Printers depended in part on printing cards for their livelihoods. The money they made contributed to local economies and supported tithes to the Church. So the Church, benefitting from the printing of cards, was reluctant to ban them.

2. The Hierophant and the High Priestess Cards Came Later

Because of the connection to gambling, playing cards were sometimes banned by communities, but there’s no evidence that was the case for Tarot cards. This probably had to do with their popularity among the wealthy nobility, who of course wielded power with both the Church and the State. However, after the Reformation the Church did object to cards depicting the Pope and Papess, two Major Arcana cards at the time. Therefore, card printers substituted the Hierophant — who still looks like a Pope in most Tarot decks — and his female counterpart, the High Priestess.

3 Tarot Cards Weren’t Designed for Fortune Telling

The original Tarot cards were meant for gaming. These games included “tarocchini” in Italy, “tarot” in France, and “königrufen” in German-speaking areas. Some of these original Tarot card games are still played today. For example, in 2001 “königrufen” was Austria’s third most popular card game. It uses a deck like a Tarot deck, with an extra face or court card and the Major Arcana. Tarot decks began to be used for fortune-telling on the continent by 1750. The cards were popular as divination aids later that century in France, when the Tarot of Marseilles was being printed.

4. No Card Is Truly “Bad”

Some cards — such as Death, the Devil, and several Swords cards — might look scary, but no card is inherently “bad.” For example, the Death card could mean the death of a habit such as smoking or overeating, which is certainly not a negative thing. It shows that something is ending to make way for something better ahead.  A Tarot reading points out the things you need to pay attention to in your life, and whether a card is negative depends on how the card is placed and what other cards accompany it.

Want more information about Tarot cards and readings? I’m pleased to offer single-card, three-card, and Celtic Cross ten-card readings at various price ranges, all via email or face-to-face across Zoom or Skype.

And, although the world is an uncertain place right now, if you’re planning a future party — whether it’s an intimate get-together or a large-scale event, consider adding the excitement of Tarot readings. I’d love to chat with you, so to find out more, please email info@tarotbyemail.com.

I am the Weekend Witch, and I can’t wait to help you meet your destiny!


Groundhog Day, Imbolc and St. Brigid’s Day — What Can They Mean to You?

Have you seen the 1993 comic film Groundhog Day? In it, an egotistical journalist is forced to live the same day — February 2 — repeatedly until he lets go of his selfish ways.

tarot | tarotbyemail | emailtarot | tarot readings | tarot reader | Tarot London | corporate tarot | business tarotIn America, Groundhog Day comprises a tradition, brought to Pennsylvania by German settlers, that if a groundhog (a large North American rodent) emerges from its den and doesn’t see a shadow, there will be an early spring. The belief stems from a similar tradition about a badger in German-speaking countries. And this in turn comes from a comparable idea about cloudy weather on Candlemas (February 2).

The pagan, Druid, or witches’ holiday most closely related to Groundhog Day is Imbolc, which begins at sunset on February 1 and ends at sunset on February 2. Imbolc marks an approximate midpoint between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. It coincides with the Catholic feast day of Saint Brigid (a Christian form of the Celtic fertility goddess Brig). The celebration of St. Brigid’s Day on February 1 was established by the Catholic Church to replace Brig and Imbolc.

Imbolc doesn’t mark the beginning of spring — that, of course, is the spring equinox — but it marks a gradual movement from winter to spring, as the days lengthen and the weather warms. Therefore, it was important for primitive peoples living in freezing huts on meagre stores of food. Coinciding roughly with the lambing season and the first sowings of spring, it gave hope that a time of sunshine and happiness lay ahead — just as cloudy weather does for Groundhog Day followers.

The Celtic goddess Brig was said to visit homes late at night on February 1. To find favour with her and achieve fertility and prosperity as spring arrived, people would leave out treats and milk, like the biscuits some families leave on the kitchen table for Father Christmas.

In the late 20th century, neopagans and Wiccans began celebrating Imbolc as a religious holiday. It is a celebration of the hearth and the home, and it may involve blazing bonfires, candles (especially white and green ones), feasts, and spring cleanings. Visits may be made to a nearby river or spring, where small offerings of coins are given and a bit of water is collected to bless the threshold, hearth and home.

Modern Imbolc celebrations are often — but not exclusively — seen as a time for women-only get-togethers. Some gatherings include outdoor fire rituals, and most involve a grand feast in honour of the saint or goddess.

Regardless of how you view February 1 and 2, this is a perfect time to release what you’re clinging to from the past so you can look to the future. You may wish to declutter your home or even declutter your life, clearing out things, ideas, and relationships that no longer benefit you. This way, you make space in your home, your heart, and your mind for beautiful new beginnings.

Happy Imbolc, happy St. Brigid’s Feast, and happy Groundhog Day!

Want more information about Tarot cards and readings? As well as coaching, I’m pleased to offer single-card, three-card, and Celtic Cross ten-card readings at various price ranges, all via email or face-to-face across Zoom or Skype.

And, although the world is an uncertain place right now, if you’re planning a future party – whether it’s an intimate get-together or a large-scale event, consider adding the excitement of Tarot readings. I’d love to chat with you, so to find out more, please email info@tarotbyemail.com.

I am the Weekend Witch, and I can’t wait to help you meet your destiny!